Airway Educational Project

Medinfo Sites weblog
15
Jul


closed

 
28
Feb


closed

 
26
May


closed

 
15
Feb


closed

 
4
Apr


Podcast Episode 6 (Muscle Relaxants)

By •• Posted in Lectures, Podcast

In this episode the controversial issue of the routine use of muscle relaxants in airway management will be discussed

Click the link below to view the video.

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4
Apr


Podcast Episode 3 (Evaluation)

By •• Posted in Lectures, Podcast

In this episode I will be discussing some basic principles behind preoperative evaluation of the airway.

Click the link below to view the video.

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26
Jan


Are we ignoring this important issue? Will this change our practices in the future?

By •• Posted in Devices, SGA

In an upcoming issue of Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica the following article will appear ( I am including the abstract). I must confess this concern about SGA’s -that perhaps should be extended to all of them- had not been on my radar screen for quite a while. Any comments?

“Exposure to anaesthetic trace gases during general anaesthesia: CobraPLA vs. LMA classic

Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany and Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna,Austria.

Background: To prospectively investigate the performance,sealing capacity and operating room (OR) staff exposure to waste anaesthetic gases during the use of the Cobra perilaryngeal airway (CobraPLA) compared with the laryngeal mask airway classic (LMA). Methods: Sixty patients were randomly assigned to the CobraPLA or the LMA group. Insertion time, number ofinsertion attempts and airway leak pressures were assessed after induction of anaesthesia. Occupational exposure to nitrous oxide (N2O) and Sevoflurane (SEV) was measured at the anaesthetists’ breathing zone and the patients’ mouth using a photoacoustic infrared spectrometer. Results: N2O waste gas concentrations differed significantly in the anaesthetist’s breathing zone (11.7-7.2 p.p.m. in CobraPLA vs. 4.1  4.3 p.p.m. in LMA,P50.03), whereas no difference could be shown in SEV concentrations. Correct CobraPLA positioning was possible in 28 out of 30 patients (more than one attempt necessary in five patients). Correct positioning of the LMA classic was possible in all 30 patients (more than one attempt in three patients). Peak airway pressure was higher in the CobraPLA group (16  3 vs. 14  2 cmH2O, P50.01). The average leak pressure of the CobraPLA was (24 +/- 4 cmH2O), compared with (20 +/-  4 cmH2O) of the LMA classic (Po0.001; all values means  SD). Conclusion: Despite higher airway seal pressures, the CobraPLA caused higher intraoperative N2O trace concentrations in the anaesthetists’ breathing zone. Accepted for publication 11 November 2009 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation”

 
 
12
Jan


Randomized controlled studies in airway topics… how common are they?

Despite some considering the airway as “the cornerstone of anesthesia” if one looks closely, the amount of RCS on the subject, actually are very, very rare. Doing studies on the airway is perhaps inherently difficult because the stakes of things going the wrong way are basically too high. The majority of the literature or information we have on the subject is anecdotal, or retrospective, but RCS are a dime a dozen. Take a look at this letter criticizing  some researches for what they did in their research (I am including the original article as well) and tell me what you think. I look forward for a lively discussion.

Can J AnesthJ Can Anesth 2009 Adnet

Manual In-line stabilization

 
 
22
Dec


Interesting and Timely topic

The judge gave the verdict of… guilty. We are not currently doing this and I somewhat agree with the author. It would be interesting to see if you think we should and the issue of how, naturally comes to mind.

Look forward to your comments.

Glidescope letter

 
 
15
Sep


Controlled RSI in Peds?

By •• Posted in Uncategorized

It would be very interesting to hear comments from our fellow members of the Peds. group regarding this never ending controversy of RSI. Does this simulation study give us the answer? 

Controlled RSI in Peds